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West Nile virus: Foreign Office warns Greece holidaymakers to take alertness against mosquitoes

This year, mosquito bites were added to the usual tourist warnings about out of control fires and strikes in Greece.

It comes after in excess of 300 cases of the virus were accounted for in the nation in 2018, a steep rise from previous years.

The World Health Organization ascribed the 2018 spike to a promising start of transmission season, expedited by high temperatures and broadened blustery spells, which give a perfect reproducing ground to mosquitoes conveying the virus.

As indicated by the Foreign Office, in excess of 3 million visits are made to the Mediterranean nation by British nationals every year.

While most visits are “trouble-free”, the British Foreign Office has exhorted that: “There were a number of cases of West Nile virus in Greece in 2018.

“You should consider preventative measures to minimise exposure to mosquitoes, for example using mosquito repellent when outdoors and closing doors or windows or using screens.”

It additionally cautioned against customary strikes, particularly to open transport, limited or serious climate extremes and wildfires.

A record 316 individuals were tainted with the infection a year ago, bringing about the demise of 50 Greek individuals, as indicated by the Guardian.

Danai Pervanidou who heads the workplace for vector-borne diseases at the national association for general health (Keelpno) told the newspaper: “There have been enough cases to know that this is now a public health issue.

“The virus has established itself in Greece through migratory birds and we are recommending that everyone takes personal protective measures such as wearing long sleeves, avoiding places with stagnant water and using mosquito nets and repellent.”

“It is impossible to predict the area of virus circulation because of its complex epidemiology but what we do know is that it has moved from villages and wetlands in rural areas to big urban centres, including the Attica region [around Athens] and Thessaloniki,” Mr Pervanidou continued.

“Just as in winter when we expect an outbreak of influenza, in summer we now have to expect cases of West Nile fever. We have to be prepared.”