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In 2021, when to see the Shooting stars and eclipses

Clouds may hinder Pittsburgh-territory sky watchers from seeing the Geminid meteor shower this end of the week, however there’s consistently one year from now.

In 2021, we’ll have a lot of meteor showers, in addition to several halfway lunar eclipses and one fractional solar eclipse. Here’s a timetable of reasons to watch the sky one year from now, as indicated by in-the-sky.org.

Jan. 3 – Peak of the Quadrantid meteor shower. Up to 111 meteors for every hour might be noticeable. The shower will be obvious for the duration of the night, peaking shortly before dawn.

Jan. 21 – The Moon, Mars and Uranus will make a nearby methodology, obvious together in the night sky.

May 6 – Peak of the Aquariid meteor shower. Up to 30 meteors for each hour might be noticeable. The shower will be visible between 3 a.m. and dawn.

May 26 – Total lunar eclipse. The full eclipse won’t be obvious from Pittsburgh, however we’ll have the option to see a partial eclipse peaking around 5:45 a.m.

June 21 – Partial solar eclipse, peaking at 5:53 a.m.

July 30 – Peak of the Southern Aquariid Meteor Shower. Up to 20 meteors an hour might be obvious. The shower will be visible after 11 p.m. July 29, peaking around 2 a.m.

Aug. 12 – Peak of the Perseid meteor shower. Up to 140 meteors for each hour might be obvious. The shower will be obvious for the duration of the night, peaking shortly before dawn.

Oct. 21 – Peak of the Orionid meteor shower. Up to 13 meteors for every hour might be visible. The shower will be visible for the duration of the night, peaking shortly before dawn.

Nov. 19 – Partial lunar shroud, peaking soon after 4 a.m.

Dec. 14 – Peak of the Geminid Meteor Shower. Up to 120 meteors for each hour might be obvious. The shower will be visible for the duration of the night, peaking around 2 a.m.

Nothing impressing you for one year from now? Show patient. On April 8, 2024, the next total solar eclipse will pass only north of our locale.

While southwest Pennsylvania will get a partial eclipse, one need just travel similarly as Erie to be in the “path of totality.” Cleveland and Buffalo likewise will see a full eclipse that day.